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Battling Sleep Deprivation with Your Bedroom Design

Battling Sleep Deprivation with Your Bedroom Design

Around one third of people don’t get enough sleep in Arizona, warns Cronkite News, echoing the situation in states across America. Stress, gadget use, and trying to get too much packed into a single day are the main culprits, yet as the CDC warns, good sleep is as much about quality as quantity. If you have just bought a gorgeous condo from Phoenix Urban Spaces, then without a doubt you will have cancelled out one major bugbear to good sleep – noise. However, there are more ways you can optimize your rest time by choosing the right design. Doing so will have an added bonus – it may attract buyers if you ever decide to sell your home.

What is Sleep Quality?

As mentioned above, absolute silence is one key factor of uninterrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, good sleep involves falling asleep within half an hour of getting into bed, waking up no more than once, and being awake for no longer than 20 minutes after you first fall asleep. In order to achieve all these requirements, you need to sleep in line with the body’s natural circadian rhythms. These prompt us to feel sleepy in the dark and alert when the sun is out. Therefore, you may need to make a few changes if too much light is getting into your bedroom at night.

Blackout Curtains and Good Sleep

To feel truly rested, you need to reach the restorative phase of deep sleep – something which can be hard to do if light enters through the curtains or windows. You can either opt for blackout curtains (which come in a wide array of designs and colors), electric blinds (which let as much light in or out as you need), or static-cling film, which instantly darkens a space and can easily be removed if required – for instance, if you decide to sell your condo. Bear in mind that features like electric blinds are attractive and will definitely raise the appeal of your condo if you decide to put it on the market. The darkness of a room is something you should take into account even when you are out of town, opting for accommodation with blackout features. Make sure all bedrooms are dark, including guest rooms. This will ensure that guests on holiday will sleep well regardless of the fact they are away from home.

Color Selection Matters

It can be tempting to choose your favorite color for your walls, floors, and furniture items, but bear in mind that colors do affect mood and emotions. For instance, red or bright orange are vivid and energizing, but to feel sleepy, calming hues like green, lavender, or blue are more ideal. The color of your lighting is also important. Research conducted by scientists at the University of Hertfordshire, for instance, found that subdued green light enhances the production of dopamine (a ‘feel good’ neurotransmitter) in the brain, while an artificial blue sky on the ceiling helps create a gentle form of sensory relaxation. The latter enables people to focus inward and distracts them from the stressors that can keep them up all night.

The perfect bedroom should be cool, quiet, and dark. Layout is also important; an uncluttered space is more conducive to relaxation, while untidiness and an excess of furniture can increase stress levels. If you find that you wake up tired instead of refreshed (despite getting your seven to nine hours of sleep), you could lack in sleep quality. If this is owing to your bedroom design, making a change will make a big difference to your mood and overall health.

Sent in and written by: Karoline Gore

Photo courtesy of Bruce Mars